Tag Archives: ipv6

IPv6 over PPPoE – RouterOS v5.10

IPv6 prefix delegation support comes to PPPoE in RouterOS version v5.10* so for those of you ready to jump onboard this release, here’s my attempt at a best-practice way to set it all up.

IPv6 has been around in RouterOS for a while now, but the specific feature that was introduced is called “DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation” which allows RouterOS to receive a prefix (or a bunch of framed routes if you’re more familiar with that terminology) that it can then distribute out itself.

This means for someone like myself, using IPv6 with my local Internet Service Provider becomes relatively straightforward, with no more need for tunneled IPv6 connections. Continue reading IPv6 over PPPoE – RouterOS v5.10

MUM 2010 – Phoenix

For those of you who missed it, the most recent Mikrotik User Meeting (MUM) was on just a few days ago in the USA.

Videos of the presentations (which are all very interesting) are available on tiktube and I would highly recommend you check out Greg Sowell‘s presentation on Troubleshooting.


Greg has also just finished his Mikrotik Certified Trainer course so will be running http://mikrotikuniversity.com for those of you who would like to sharpen your mikrotik skills.

Other interesting things to come out of the conference include:

More IPv6 support (yay!)

Support for Cisco compatible GRE tunnels

Support for using a fully qualified domain name for IPSEC tunnels (removing the need for something like this: http://www.mikrotik-routeros.com/?p=29)

New hardware:

RB493G (Gigabit ports)

New Software:

Something I’ll post on more fully when I’ve seen the finished product: Flashfig, an app for installing configs on multiple routers (useful for cpe’s) simultaneously.

There’s some documentation on it already available here for now: http://wiki.mikrotik.com/wiki/Flashfig

IPv6 and Mikrotik – Using 6to4

Please note this guide assumes some basic knowledge of IPv4 and IPv6 address space.

Many of you may know of the impending doom that surrounds the IPv4 network and lack of remaining IP ranges.

The question is, how many people are actually doing anything about it? Given the slow take up worldwide I thought it worthwhile I do a post here to explain how you can get IPv6 on your network now.
No support required from your upstream ISP and without having to send your traffic half way around the world to a Hurricane Electric tunnel (hopefully).

So, what is 6to4?

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6to4

6to4 is an Internet transition mechanism for migrating from IPv4 to IPv6, a system that allows IPv6 packets to be transmitted over an IPv4 network (generally the IPv4 internet) without the need to configure explicit tunnels. Special relay servers are also in place that allow 6to4 networks to communicate with native IPv6 networks.
6to4 is especially relevant during the initial phases of deployment to full, native IPv6 connectivity, since IPv6 is not required on nodes between the host and the destination. However, it is intended only as transition mechanism and is not meant to be used permanently.

Continue reading IPv6 and Mikrotik – Using 6to4

Mikrotik Hotspot Authentication for IPv6 dual-stacked clients

In preparation for some IPv6 testing of our hotspot systems, I’ve come up with the following temporary authentication method for dual-stacked users.

Seeing as the login redirect goes via an IPv4 webserver, if enabled IPv6 traffic passes by the hotspot unhindered. This is my work on enabling the IPv6 side of things when a user logs in or out of the hotspot with a dual stacked client.

This has been implemented on my demo v4.10 router and tested with both Mac OS X 10.6 and Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Continue reading Mikrotik Hotspot Authentication for IPv6 dual-stacked clients