Tag Archives: routerboard

CRS Basic Vlan Configuration

I’ve been playing around with v6.13rc12 over the last week on a CRS125-24G-1S and have put together a an example script for provisioning the unit with a user-vlan and an admin-vlan that are trunked back via the SFP port.

I’ve been waiting for a long time to have a usable and readable switch chip config on the CRS platform, so I hope this is useful for some of you guys too.


Continue reading CRS Basic Vlan Configuration

Routerboard 10Gbps capable hardware coming soon?

This was spotted today in the Mikrotik Wiki’s supported hardware list.

Brand Model Rate Connector/Cable Type Wavelength Tested with Works/Doesn’t
MikroTik RB SFP3401 10/100/1000 RJ45, Cat6 RB2011LS-IN Works. Available in Q3!
MikroTik RB SFP5602D-53 155M~2.63G Bi-Di LC, MM 1550/1310 RB2011LS-IN Works. Available in Q3!
MikroTik RB SFP5602D-35 155M~2.63G Bi-Di LC, MM 1310/1550 RB2011LS-IN Works. Available in Q3!
MikroTik RB SFP3420D 1,25G LC, MM 1310 RB2011LS-IN Works. Available in Q3!
MikroTik RB SFP3903D 10G LC, MM 850 RB2011LS-IN and TBA Works. Available in Q3!

.. wait what?

RB SFP3903D listed as 10G and working in a yet to be announced product (TBA).

Are they  referring to another as yet unannounced model of the CCR or something entirely new? More info here as we find it!

Update: Relevant reading from Tilera – http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Tileras-TILE-Gx-MikroTiks-RouterOS-Unleash-Worlds-First-36-Core-Cloud-Core-Router-1678838.htm 

This would lead us to believe the SFP in question is a 10Gig SFP+ module intended to work in an as yet unannounced CCR model,  joy to the routing world!

Quick Set Preview

Just a couple of quick screen shots of the new “Quick Set” mode available in some of the newest releases.

As you can see the dropdown box top left lets you select the mode for the device and puts all the basic configuration options in one place.

AP mode:


And CPE mode:

The addition of a signal strength graph over time is nice and handy for keeping track of the nearby networks you’re going to borrow internet from  check connections for when testing this out.


We mentioned this earlier in thebrotherswisp podcast if you missed it, looks like it’s going to make the entry level setup a whole lot easier for those new to MikroTik.

MikroTik Cloud Core Router: CCR-1036 (Updated)

Announced less than 24 hours ago at the Warsaw MUM, comes the first (and hopefully not the last) MikroTik shot at high end routing.

Update 2012-07-16: Tilera has made a press release confirming their processors will be used in the CCR-1036. You can read the full thing here.


Mikrotik CLOUD CORE Router CCR-1036

  • 36 core networking CPU (1.2Ghz per core)
  • New 64bit processor – assuming this one
  • New Future models will support 10Gig SFP+ configurations
  • 12 Mbytes total on-chip cache
  • High speed encryption engine
  • 4 x SFP ports
  • 12 x Gigabit Ethernet ports
  • Colour Touchscreen LCD
  • 1U Rackmount case
  • 16 Gigabit throughput
  • 15 Million+ Packets Per Second on Fast-Path
  • 8 Million+ Packets Per Second on Standard-Path
  • All ports directly connected to CPU (We assuming this means no switch chips will be present)

The release date is said to be sometime this summer however given previous releases the authors opinion is to take this with a grain of salt. A redundant PSU version is also said to be planned for those requiring higher reliability given the high performance/throughput of the device.   The router is suspected to be based of the TILE-Gx8036 processor, a 36 core beast built for networking applications.

Here’s Gregs take on it all: http://gregsowell.com/?p=3625


My Opinions (Andrew Cox / Omega-00)

While I’m super excited about the prospect of something that’s able to handle routing at wirespeed + likely a bunch of firewall, filter and QoS settings; I’m also a little concerned about how the CPU loading will take place and if there will be any additional failsafes put in place to make this product as reliable as it needs to be.

Given we’re still at a place where we can’t get support and maintenance contracts from MikroTik, the platform needs to be as stable as a rock and while I find this is pretty much the case with all basic features there’s still some overlooked issues that pop up over time with specific features causing memory leaks and the like.

At present I’ve taken a liking to running systems either with:

a) a remote access card allowing direct console input and the ability to power cycle the router independently of it being responsive.

b) ESXi as the base OS and RouterOS running on top of this to allow an extra layer of protection and management (also gives the ability to backup and restore in the event a version upgrade goes bad) c) Dual boot loader, allowing fallback to a previous working version in the event of some sort of bootup failure. My guesstimate on pricing: $1500-$1800USD


My Opinions (Andrew Thrift):

This is a move in the right direction for Mikrotik.  The Cloud Core product line will provide a viable alternative to the Juniper MX5 and Cisco ASR-900x series of routers for ethernet based enterprise and small ISP networks. It will also provide users with a Mikrotik supported platform that can provide over 10gigabit of throughput, where previously they were forced to use a 3rd party x86 server.

Based on the information released so far, this product appears to be:

– Using the new Tilera GX8036 processor

– Using the 6windgate software  a replacement for the Linux networking stack Confirmed false by 6windgate. 

These will allow Mikrotik the following features

Edit: While 6windgate software is not being used for this, it is likely we may see some of these features regardless from MikroTik direclty.

– Allocation of Tiles to different functions e.g. 1st tile can be used for “Control” while next 6 tiles are used for packet processing

– Fast Path packet processing, on the first pass packets are inspected (slow path), while subsequent flows do not need to be inspected so do not reach the CPU. This will boost raw throughput, and will integrate with Queue Trees, allowing for very efficient traffic shaping systems.

– Hardware based “virtualisation” – Multiple instances of RouterOS will be able to run on a group of Tiles at native speed, no hypervisor required. This allows for native performance as there is no hypervisor.


A design change with the new Cloud Core Routers, Mikrotik look to have FINALLY moved to using a standard metal casing with a printed plastic sticker with cutouts for the connectors.  I hope this is adopted across the RB2011 line, it makes the products look far more professional, and will of course lower manufacturing costs due to not needing to retool for different model variations.


In the future I hope to see a modular Cloud Core Router product that can take two PSU’s, either AC or DC and has flexible module bays, with options such as 2x SFP+, 8x SFP, 8xRJ45 this will allow providers to build resilient MPLS networks on modern high speed links, find use in the modern data centre, and allow use for Metro Ethernet applications.

Queue outside please!

New toys you say?

More gadgets Q?


Noticed this little gem in the MikroTik wiki this morning while reviewing Queue Types.

Note: Starting from v5.8 there is new kind none and new default queue only-hardware-queue. All RouterBOARDS will have this new queue type set as default interface queue

only-hardware-queue leaves interface with only hw transmit descriptor ring buffer which acts as a queue in itself. Usually at least 100 packets can be queued for transmit in transmit descriptor ring buffer. Transmit descriptor ring buffer size and the amount of packets that can be queued in it varies for different types of ethernet MACs.

Having no software queue is especially beneficial on SMP systems because it removes the requirement to synchronize access to it from different cpus/cores which is expensive.

multi-queue-ethernet-default can be beneficial on SMP systems with ethernet interfaces that have support for multiple transmit queues and have a linux driver support for multiple transmit queues. By having one software queue for each hardware queue there might be less time spent for synchronizing access to them.

Note: having possibility to set only-hardware-queue requires support in ethernet driver so it is available only for some ethernet interfaces mostly found on RBs.

Note: improvement from only-hardware-queue and multi-queue-ethernet-default is present only when there is no “/queue tree” entry with paticular interface as a parent.

What does this mean in laymans terms?

1. The only-hardware-queue will be available initially only for Routerboard devices and perhaps some other supported ethernet chipsets in the future.

2. The basic interface queueing is removed from being passed to the CPU and done on the interface hardware directly which should result in a net performance increase.

3. For SMP (x86 boxes with multiple CPU cores) machines with high end interfaces (1GB, 10GB) there is a queue type that allows a queue to be broken up across multiple CPU cores to match the multiple TX and RX chains offered on these interfaces.